Create a Buzz With Teaser Ad Campaigns

Whether you’re launching the latest addition to an existing product line or you plan on providing an entirely new service to your customer base, companies looking to bring out a new offering will, quite obviously, want to get people talking about it. A good way to create a buzz is by using teaser adverts.

As you may have guessed from the name, teaser ad campaigns come out several weeks or months in anticipation of a full-blown marketing drive. These are focused on building hype around a forthcoming product or service and getting a target audience to talk about it, even if they don’t know what it actually is or the name of the company that is behind it.

With this in mind, it’s important that your teaser campaigns provide enough information to get a target audience interested in what you are about to release, but don’t contain so much that they have no incentive to learn more about it when you decide to ramp up your promotional efforts at a later date.


The best teaser ad initiatives tend to be those that constantly give an audience new information and provide an incentive to find out when the next element of your campaign – whether it’s a new TV ad or the location of a free product giveaway – will be launched.

Alternatively, you might want to try using a flash mob event to create interest in your brand. Getting a group of people to perform a seemingly random act in a public place (previous flash mobs have seen companies get hundreds of participants to perform dance routines and break out into synchronised applause in shops) is a great way to catch the interest of passersby.

With any luck, a flash mob will result in dozens of people stopping what they are doing and watching your performance. Once it is over, you have a wonderful chance to provide potential customers with more information about your company, something that could be achieved by giving out promotional merchandise.

Doing so is a great way to encourage people to interact with your brand long after the event has finished, so it’s vital to make sure the products you distribute have a link to your website and contain details of when the new service/product that you are promoting will be fully launched. There are certainly plenty of products suitable for giving away at flash mob events, but it’s best to select items that are fairly small so they can be easily popped into pockets and purses.

This could include everyday items such as pens that can be used repeatedly and, in the process, encourage long-term brand interaction. However, handing out unusual items – such as stress shapes that feature quirky designs – may create a more immediate short-term impact in terms of getting recipients to remember your teaser ad campaign and generate interest in the launch of your forthcoming product.

Whatever you choose, make sure that your design is consistent with the identity of your overall campaign and your company as a whole. Otherwise, your target audience may struggle to make the connection between the teaser ads and your organisation, as well as the products/services they are meant to promote.

How has your company used teaser ad campaigns? Post a comment below and let us know!

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Create a Buzz With Teaser Ad Campaigns

Whether you’re launching the latest addition to an existing product line or you plan on providing an entirely new service to your customer base, companies looking to bring out a new offering will, quite obviously, want to get people talking about it. A good way to create a buzz is by using teaser adverts.

As you may have guessed from the name, teaser ad campaigns come out several weeks or months in anticipation of a full-blown marketing drive. These are focused on building hype around a forthcoming product or service and getting a target audience to talk about it, even if they don’t know what it actually is or the name of the company that is behind it.

With this in mind, it’s important that your teaser campaigns provide enough information to get a target audience interested in what you are about to release, but don’t contain so much that they have no incentive to learn more about it when you decide to ramp up your promotional efforts at a later date.


The best teaser ad initiatives tend to be those that constantly give an audience new information and provide an incentive to find out when the next element of your campaign – whether it’s a new TV ad or the location of a free product giveaway – will be launched.

Alternatively, you might want to try using a flash mob event to create interest in your brand. Getting a group of people to perform a seemingly random act in a public place (previous flash mobs have seen companies get hundreds of participants to perform dance routines and break out into synchronised applause in shops) is a great way to catch the interest of passersby.

With any luck, a flash mob will result in dozens of people stopping what they are doing and watching your performance. Once it is over, you have a wonderful chance to provide potential customers with more information about your company, something that could be achieved by giving out promotional merchandise.

Doing so is a great way to encourage people to interact with your brand long after the event has finished, so it’s vital to make sure the products you distribute have a link to your website and contain details of when the new service/product that you are promoting will be fully launched. There are certainly plenty of products suitable for giving away at flash mob events, but it’s best to select items that are fairly small so they can be easily popped into pockets and purses.

This could include everyday items such as pens that can be used repeatedly and, in the process, encourage long-term brand interaction. However, handing out unusual items – such as stress shapes that feature quirky designs – may create a more immediate short-term impact in terms of getting recipients to remember your teaser ad campaign and generate interest in the launch of your forthcoming product.

Whatever you choose, make sure that your design is consistent with the identity of your overall campaign and your company as a whole. Otherwise, your target audience may struggle to make the connection between the teaser ads and your organisation, as well as the products/services they are meant to promote.

How has your company used teaser ad campaigns? Post a comment below and let us know!

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